society

Faith is the Okayness of Not Knowing

Faith is the Okayness of Not Knowing

“Faith, what does it mean?

In modern society, we’re educated in trusting our rational minds. We’re taught that emotions are unreliable, that dreams are just childish fantasies, and that important life decisions need to be made by carefully weighing all the logical arguments in favour of everything.

Now, right on top of that, we’re taught that to “have faith” (in the religious sense) means blindly believing someone else’s story about something they don’t actually know for themselves, but which they’ve chosen to blindly believe from someone else. In other words, we’re taught a version of faith that’s one fancy telephone game.”

The Difference Between Religion and Spirituality

The Difference Between Religion and Spirituality

Spirituality is a path that aims at the resolution of the inner conflicts society instills within us. Where society would have us obey and follow in other people’s shadows rather than becoming the true masters of our own destiny, spirituality gives us the tools for finding strength and harmony in embracing and expressing our individuality — in becoming all that we are meant to be.

Religion would have us provided with ready wisdom and all the answers to the fundamental questions of being, but in doing that it only serves to create a great divide within us. The mind will accept dogma and beliefs and strive to live by them, but the deeper intuitive self — the non-rational part we might refer to as the subconscious — knows these beliefs to be in conflict with its own truth.

We're All Raised to be Addicts, but What Can We do About It?

We're All Raised to be Addicts, but What Can We do About It?

“Addiction is a symptom. It's the symptom of a need to run away from something. If we need to run away from the symptom of the cure, then all we've done is go full circle. It's the vicious circle of avoidance, which is perhaps the biggest plague of modern society.

We have so many different means of running away from pain or unpleasantness at our disposal, and very efficient means — purified sugar, chemicalized drugs, instant entertainment, easy sex — how can we not be ever and constantly tempted by one escape or the other? And when the escape becomes ineffective, then how tempting it is to escape from the escape!

This, I feel, is how we learn to live in our society. We learn to stay busy, to develop hobbies — to be constantly on the go, and we praise those who keep a busy schedule. We call them popular or cultured. But ultimately, if there's a need to constantly be busy and run away from aloneness, what culture is that but one of avoidance? Burn-outs might just be the result of failing to stop running — whatever it is we're running to or fro — and depression might just be a symptom of failing to sit with oneself and simply listen.“